FINDING YOUR WAY

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A map and compass make up two of the essentials recommended for safe backcountry travel, but they’ll do little good if you don’t know how to use them. Misuse could even turn a situation in which you’re simply confused into one in which you’re totally lost. The bottom line? Learn proper technique before your safety depends on it.

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WATCH VIDEOS BELOW

Topo Map Reading

Compass Navigation

Bring An Analog Watch For Back-up Compass

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WATCH VIDEO TO LEARN MORE

No matter how prepared you may be for an outdoor adventure or how confident you are in your ability to follow a trail, it’s always a good idea to be prepared for the unexpected. 

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Self-rescue tips:

If after careful planning and consideration you decide that you try to rescue yourself, here are some tips to remember:

  • Stop and rest when you start to feel tired. Don’t wait until you are exhausted.

  • Your body can’t hike hard and digest food at the same time. Rest in the shade for at least 30 minutes when you stop to eat. If you are still tired after 30 minutes, continue to rest.

  • Make sure to drink enough water to avoid dehydration. Symptoms include heading, feelings of irritation and frustration and more tiredness than warranted.

  • Stop and fix small problems while they are still small. If you ignore your body and keep pushing, the pain or illness will only get worse and make recovery more difficult.

  • Avoid hiking between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. on hot days. If you are on a trail between those hours, find a shady spot and stay there until the temperature cools down. Adjust you’re hiking pace to what you can comfortably maintain and rest when you feel the need.

Remember: You are responsible for your own safety and for the safety of those around you.

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